Platige Image | STASH MAGAZINE

Platige Image Rebrand by Juice

After 15 years Polish CG powerhouse Platige Image “decided to change the logo and comprehensively overhaul the brand.” The new logo was created by Adam Tunikowski and Michał Misiński at Warsaw studio Juice:

“We set out to develop the rebranding concept in three directions. One direction was to follow the example of brand logos from the 1960s and 1970s. We wanted to design something akin to the classics, like IBM, CITGO, PanAM, Southland, Weber, and CPN, as they all are heavy, easily recognizable forms that are still in use today. We looked for simplicity and an “edge” that Platige already had as a company.

Platige Image | STASH MAGAZINE

 

“Another direction, extremely different from the first one, was to take a closer look at the French-sounding phonetic pronunciation of the name. We attempted to present the brand in a form that would fit something light, and that translated into round shapes, simplicity, and graceful composition.

“The third direction – a backup solution, in case all the other solutions fail – was to go the conservative way: use Helvetica and Zurich as universal fonts.

Platige Image | STASH MAGAZINE

Platige Image | STASH MAGAZINE

 

“Each time we went ahead following only one guideline: simplicity. That’s how we got it into our heads that the only correct solution would be to design the logo by compressing the three elements – the mathematical sign π [the basis for the previous Platige logo], and the world “platige” and “image” – into one simple message: “Pi.”

Platige Image | STASH MAGAZINE

 

“PI is an acronym for Platige Image, and the word itself holds a multitude of meanings and inspirations. A mathematical symbol that holds a certain mystery, represents an infinite string of numbers, defines spirals, and is calculated with triangles inscribed in circles – that’s a lot of geometry and geometry is always welcome when you’re designing a logo.

“Our design approach was based on a spiral and a triangle born of the curve. The triangle, in turn, created the letter P, with the resulting design mostly retaining the shape of the π symbol.”

 

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