Best of Stash event Titles | STASH MAGAZINE

Best of Stash 2017: Event Title Design

On the rise in both scope and prestige for the last five years, event titles blossomed as a dominant expressive outlet in 2017 providing the catalyst for passionate new levels of fun and experimentation.

NAMES OF NOTE IN 2017:
You’ll find a wide selection of design and motion talent here spanning from well-established teams like FutureDeluxe, Framestore, and Imaginary Forces thru to one-man Serbian force of nature Sava Zivkovic and rising Beijing star Zaoeyo.

On the client side, the OFFF Festival series is featured for both their London and Mexico events.

All these projects are part of The Stash Permanent Collection and are listed in reverse chronological order by publication date.
 
 

 
OFFF LONDON
Stash 126

FutureDeluxe CD Andrew Jones: “The film itself is an abstract take on the creative community and how we all share ideas & knowledge. Those ideas are always changing and adapting as the ‘knowledge’ is passed through the community.”
 
 

 
PLAYGROUNDS 2017
Stash 126

Direction/animator Sava Zivkovic in Belgrade, Serbia: “A deserted world devoid of any human inhabitants, occupied only by utility droids, trying to mimic the behavior of their creators. A tale of friendship and love, discovered in the most peculiar places.

“Just getting everything done by myself in one month was a challenge. Not your average assignment, but the project was just too damn fun to work on!”
 
 

 
OFFF CDMX
Stash 126

Director Sharon Lock at Framestore in London: “Starting with a blank page creatively, that’s what I find the most challenging, it’s the opposite of how I’m used to working.

“That, along with Hector from OFFF not wanting to know what we were doing, no treatment, no WIPs. The first time he wanted to see it would be when we pressed play and presented it for the first time, live in front of an audience of 1000.”
 
 

 
TEDX SYDNEY
Stash 124

Australian director Scott Geersen at Substance: “TED talks distills large, complicated concepts into short, extremely easy to understand presentations. How could we make the conference theme ‘unconventional’ into something just as simple but still playful? Something elementary but eloquent.

“This led us towards the idea of using the three basic geometric shapes, and we came up with about 30 different scenarios in which they could be used to create dynamic, colorful, physical demonstrations of the idea.”
 
 

 
BLEND FEST
Stash 124

Chris Kelly, creative director at Oddfellows in San Francisco: “The brief was completely open with one little twist: include the names of the nearly 400 attendees in addition to the names of the speakers.

“The impracticality of creating a four-minute, character-driven narrative became very clear as regular client work began rolling in. We were determined to make it work but the start and stop nature of the process made for a long and winding road!”
 
 

 
SXSW GAMING AWARDS
Stash 123

Jeremy Cox, director at Imaginary Forces in New York: “One of the hardest parts of a project like this is the lack of creative limitations. So, I like to start by setting up some of our own and themes to work within.

“In the previous opens our aesthetic had always been graphic or abstract, and I wanted to pose the challenge of creating something more tactile or real looking.”
 
 

 
PROMAXBDA EUROPE CONFERENCE
Stash 123

Creative directors Johan Nel and Bas Alberts at DutchToast in Amsterdam: “The actual production took about a month, but we spent many weeks conceptualizing and debating which road to take. The hardest projects are the ones where you have total freedom.

“We also created all the conference branding, promos and online awareness campaigns.”
 
 

 
PAUSE
Stash 122

Designer/animator Zaoeyo (Xiaolin Zeng) in Beijing, China: “This idea was inspired by an anime from my childhood called ‘Digimon Adventure.’ The most inspiring part of the show to me was its opening which shows different angles of a night city combined with digital elements.

“Therefore, we decided to focus on a different angle or perspective of empty cities, to express a feeling of isolation despite the fact we live together in these spaces.”
 
 

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