Marc & Emma_Oh Willy | STASH MAGAZINE

Warm and Wooly: Marc & Emma Release “Oh Willy”

After wooing audiences and collecting awards at over 80 festivals, the warm, wooly and wonderfully absurd stop motion opus “Oh Willy” by Belgian directing duo Marc James Roels and Emma De Swaef went online this morning. [Read more]

MK12 Man of Action 2 | STASH MAGAZINE

MK12’s “Man of Action! II: Ashes of Vengeance” Main Titles

Way back in 2000, the pioneering mid-west motion mavens known as MK12 let loose a silly slice of video called “Man Of Action: The Terrible Cosmic Death.” Then in early 2015, the studio released a teaser promising a sweet sequel called “Man of Action! II: Ashes of Vengeance.” [Read more]

Fluorescent Hill_Migration | STASH MAGAZINE

Fluorescent Hill Capture “Migration” on Super 8

After its spectacular run on the festival circuit, Montreal directing duo Fluorescent Hill (Mark Lomond and Johanne Ste-marie) just sent us “Migration,” their Super 8 mini-documentary capturing the enigmatic behavior of lovable and otherworldly creatures in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. [Read more]

Christophe Peladan Goutte d'Or | STASH MAGAZINE

Stop Motion Masterwork “Goutte d’Or”

So here’s the thing: the love interest is nubile, naked, flies a broom, and her octopus-wig doubles as her chaperone fending off the lusty advances of an undead, one-eyed old pirate captain while three also-undead sailors hang around playing musical wingmen. [Read more]

Media Design School Escargore | STASH MAGAZINE

The Long Trail of Slain Snails: “Escargore”

If you watched the animated short “Jinxy Jenkins, Lucky Lou” from Ringling College students Michael Bidinger and Michelle Kwon last year, you know the gap between student and professional character animation work has vanished. Here’s evidence the same has happened for character-driven VFX. [Read more]

Polyester Studio Memento Mori | STASH MAGAZINE

Have a Polyester Halloween

Just in time for Halloween, Toronto’s Polyester Studio releases a fresh mix of mad and macabre vignettes called “Memento Mori” (Latin for “remember (that you have) to die”) they describe as a celebration of the dark side of life and a reflection on our mortality. [Read more]