Rupert Saunders Audi_Birth | STASH MAGAZINE

Giving “Birth” to the Audi RS 3 Sportback

Director Andrew Proctor and the Mill+ crew play midwife to Audi’s R8 supercar as it breathes, pushes and strains to deliver the new 362bhp RS 3 Sportback in this 110-second all-CG opus created in collaboration with MJZ director Rupert Sanders thru BBH London. [Read more]

Mill+_Diary Queen | STASH MAGAZINE

Flipping for Dairy Queen “Oreo Blizzard”

The Chicago outpost of The Mill/Mill+ expand their repertoire with this impossibly happy 2D character fest for Dairy Queen powered by a catchy ditty scripted by agency Barkley US and composed by Sam Billen at Primary Color Music. [Read more]

Mill+_Legoland BMB | STASH MAGAZINE

Behind the Scenes of LEGOLAND “Awesome Awaits”

Discover how Mill+ director Russell Tickner and a 30-person crew at The Mill wrangled 900 million CG Lego bricks into 100 characters all composited into live action shot over four days in South Africa to create this roller-coaster-like spot called “Awesome Awaits” for LEGOLAND thru agency BMB. [Read more]

Mill+_Philip Stein | STASH MAGAZINE

Hand-drawn Hands of Time: Philip Stein “Technology”

Whether you’re down with the concept of Natural Frequency Technology or not, you have to admit this beautifully drafted treatment by Mill+ animation directors Kwok Fung Lam and Ivo Sousa for Philip Stein watches and bracelets is a refreshing departure from standard motion graphic explainer videos. [Read more]

Behind the Scenes: “Marco Polo” Title Sequence

Take a quick peek into the creative and technical process of Mill+ directors Ben Smith and Bryce Wymer as they conjure the Netflix “Marco Polo” titles with ink and vodka.

Mill+ Marco polo titles BTS | STASH MAGAZINE

Watch the finished titles here. [Read more]

Inky Drama for Netflix Marco Polo Titles

Mill+ co-directors Ben Smith and Bryce Wymer hit themes of greed, betrayal, sexual intrigue and rivalry in the title sequence for the new Netflix original “Marco Polo” written by John Fusco and produced by The Weinstein Group.

“Bryce developed a technique to capture the images being ‘invisibly painted’ using an overhead projector and meticulously hand-painting the images onto a dense paper stock that allowed the water to sit on the surface of the paper.

“Sumi ink (ink formulated for sumi painting and calligraphy) was then dripped onto the invisible water paintings, spreading beautifully throughout the entire image. This was captured through high-speed photography to create an elegant, monotone image, confined to the waters edges.”

Compare and contrast: Here’s a smaller scale ink-in-water treatment from 2011 called “Dirty Water” from hush.fr director/illustrator Clément Beauvais For BDDP Unlimited:

[Read more]